News and Analysis of Artificial Intelligence Technology Legal Issues

What’s in a Name? A Chatbot Given a Human Name is Still Just an Algorithm

Due in part to the learned nature of artificial intelligence technologies, the spectrum of things that exhibit “intelligence” has, in debates over such things, expanded to include certain advanced AI systems.  If a computer vision system can “learn” to recognize real objects and make decisions, the argument goes, its ability to do so can be compared to that of humans and thus should not be excluded from the intelligence debate.  By extension, AI systems that can exhibit intelligence traits should not be treated like mere goods and services, and thus laws applicable to such good and services ought not to…

The Role of Explainable Artificial Intelligence in Patent Law

Although the notion of “explainable artificial intelligence” (AI) has been suggested as a necessary component of governing AI technology, at least for the reason that transparency leads to trust and better management of AI systems in the wild, one area of US law already places a burden on AI developers and producers to explain how their AI technology works: patent law.  Patent law’s focus on how AI systems work was not borne from a Congressional mandate. Rather, the Supreme Court gets all the credit–or blame, as some might contend–for this legal development, which began with the Court’s 2014 decision in Alice…

Congress Looking at Data Science for Ways to Improve Patent Operations

When Congress passed the sweeping Leahy-Smith America Invents Act (AIA) on September 16, 2011, legislators weren’t concerned about how data analytics might improve efficiencies at one of the Commerce Department’s most data-heavy institutions: the US Patent Office. Patent reformers at the time were instead focused on curtailing patent troll litigation and conforming aspects of US patent law to those of other countries. Consequently, the Patent Office’s trove of pre-classified, pre-labeled, and semi-structured patent application and invention data–information ripe for big data analytics–remained mostly untapped at the time. Fast forward to 2018 and Congress has finally put patent data in its…

Patenting Artificial Intelligence Technology: 2018 Continues Upward Innovation Trend

If the number of patents issued in the first quarter of 2018 is any indication, artificial intelligence technology companies were busy a few years ago filing patents for machine learning inventions. According to US Patent and Trademark Office records, the number of US “machine learning” patents issued to US applicants during the first quarter of 2018 rose 17% compared to the same time period in 2017. The number of US “machine learning” patents issued to any applicant (not just US applicants) rose nearly 19% during the same comparative time period. Mostly double-digit increases were also observed in the case of…

When It’s Your Data But Another’s Stack, Who Owns The Trained AI Model?

Cloud-based machine learning algorithms, made available as a service, have opened up the world of artificial intelligence to companies without the resources to organically develop their own AI models. Tech companies that provide these services promise to help companies extract insights from the company’s unique customer, employee, product, business process, and other data, and to use those insights to improve decisions, recommendations, and predictions without the company having an army of data scientists and full stack developers. Simply open an account, provide data to the service’s algorithms, train and test an algorithm, and then incorporate the final model into the…

Not Could, But Should Intelligent Machines Have Rights?

The question of whether intelligent machines of the future could own rights to their creations has been raised in the last few years, including last year at an international conference. Often, the question of rights for machines arises in the context of recognizing pictorial copyrights in images auto-generated by algorithms, but also in the context of invention (patent) rights. The progeny of these intellectual property (IP)-specific machine-rights questions suggests another, broader query: once artificial general intelligence (AGI) is achieved, should there be legal recognition of rights for intelligent machines? In the context of IP, US laws recognize IP rights as…

Evaluating and Valuing an AI Business: Don’t Forget the IP

After record-breaking funding and deals involving artificial intelligence startups in 2017, it may be tempting to invest in the next AI business or business idea without a close look beyond a company’s data, products, user-base, and talent. Indeed, big tech companies seem willing to acquire, and investors seem happy to invest in, AI startups even before the founders have built anything. Defensible business valuations, however, involve many more factors, all of which need careful consideration during early planning of a new AI business or investing in one. One factor that should never be overlooked is a company’s actual or potential…

Patenting Artificial Intelligence: Innovation Spike Follows Broader Market Trend

If you received a US patent for a machine learning invention recently, count yourself among a record number of innovators named on artificial intelligence technology patents issued in 2017. There’s also good chance you worked for one of the top companies earning patents for machine learning, neural network, and other AI technologies, namely IBM, Amazon, Cisco, Google, and Microsoft, according to public patent records (available through mid-December). This year’s increase in the number of issued patents reflects similar record increases in the level of investment dollars flowing to AI start-ups and the number of AI tech sector M&A deals in…

Artificial Intelligence Won’t Achieve Legal Inventorship Status Anytime Soon

Imagine a deposition in which an inventor is questioned about her conception and reduction to practice of an invention directed to a chemical product worth billions of dollars to her company. Testimony reveals how artificial intelligence software, assessing huge amounts of data, identified the patented compound and the compound’s new uses in helping combat disease. The inventor states that she simply performed tests confirming the compound’s qualities and its utility, which the software had already determined. The attorney taking the deposition moves to invalidate the patent on the basis that the patent does not identify the true inventor. The true…

Marketing “Artificial Intelligence” Needs Careful Planning to Avoid Trademark Troubles

As the market for all things artificial intelligence continues heating up, companies are looking for ways to align their products, services, and entire brands with “artificial intelligence” designations and phrases common in the surging artificial intelligence industry, including variants such as “AI,” “deep,” “neural,” and others. Reminiscent of the dot.com era of the early 2000’s, when companies rushed to market with “i-” or “e-” prefixes or appended “.com” names, today’s artificial intelligence startups are finding traction with artificial intelligence-related terms and corresponding “.AI” domains. The proliferation of AI marketing, however, may lead to brand and domain disputes. But a carefully-planned…