News and Analysis of Artificial Intelligence Technology Legal Issues

Republicans Propose Commission to Study Artificial Intelligence Impacts on National Security

Three Republican members of Congress are co-sponsoring a new bill (H.R. 5356) “To establish the National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence.” Introduced by Rep. Stefanik (R-NY) on March 20, 2018, the bill would create a temporary 11-member Commission tasked with producing an initial report followed by comprehensive annual reports, each providing issue-specific recommendations about national security needs and related risks from advances in artificial intelligence, machine learning, and associated technologies. Issues the Commission would review include AI competitiveness in the context of national and economic security, means to maintain a competitive advantage in AI (including machine learning and quantum computing),…

In Your Face Artificial Intelligence: Regulating the Collection and Use of Face Data (Part I)

Of all the personal information individuals agree to provide companies when they interact with online or app services, perhaps none is more personal and intimate than a person’s facial features and their moment-by-moment emotional states. And while it may seem that face detection, face recognition, and affect analysis (emotional assessments based on facial features) are technologies only sophisticated and well-intentioned tech companies with armies of data scientists and stack engineers are competent to use, the reality is that advances in machine learning, microprocessor technology, and the availability of large datasets containing face data have lowered entrance barriers to conducting robust…

A Proposed AI Task Force to Confront Talent Shortage and Workforce Changes

Just over a month after House and Senate commerce committees received companion bills recommending a federal task force to globally examine the “FUTURE” of Artificial Intelligence in the United States (H.R. 4625; introduced Dec. 12, 2017), a House education and workforce committee is set to consider a bill calling for a task force assessment of the impacts of AI technologies on the US workforce. If enacted, the “Artificial Intelligence Job Opportunities and Background Summary Act of 2018,” or the “AI JOBS Act of 2018” (H.R. 4829; introduced Jan. 18, 2018), would require the Secretary of Labor to report on impacts and…

New York City Task Force to Consider Algorithmic Harm

One might hear discussions about backpropagation, activation functions, and gradient descent when visiting an artificial intelligence company. But more recently, terms like bias and harm associated with AI models and products have entered tech’s vernacular. These issues also have the attention of many outside of the tech world following reports of AI systems performing better for some users than for others when making life-altering decisions about prison sentences, creditworthiness, and job hiring, among others. Considering the recent number of accepted conference papers about algorithmic bias, AI technologists, ethicists, and lawyers seems to be proactively addressing the issue by sharing with…

Recognizing Individual Rights: A Step Toward Regulating Artificial Intelligence Technologies

In the movie Marjorie | Prime (August 2017), John Hamm plays an artificial intelligence version of Marjorie’s deceased husband, visible to Marjorie as a holographic projection in her beachfront home. As Marjorie (played by Lois Smith) interacts with Hamm’s Prime through a series of one-on-one conversations, the AI improves its cognition by observing and processing Marjorie’s emotional expressions, movements, and speech. The AI also learns from interactions with Marjorie’s son-in-law (Tim Robbins) and daughter (Geena Davis), as they recount highly personal and painful episodes of their lives. Through these interactions, Prime ends up possessing a collective knowledge greater and more…

Congress Takes Aim at the FUTURE of Artificial Intelligence

As the calendar turns over to 2018, artificial intelligence system developers will need to keep an eye on first of its kind legislation being considered in Congress. The “Fundamentally Understanding The Usability and Realistic Evolution of Artificial Intelligence Act of 2017,” or FUTURE of AI Act, is Congress’s first major step toward comprehensive regulation of the AI tech sector. Introduced on December 22, 2017, companion bills S.2217 and H.R.4625 touch on a host of AI issues, their stated purposes mirroring concerns raised by many about possible problems facing society as AI technologies becomes ubiquitous. The bills propose to establish a federal advisory committee…

Autonomous Vehicles Get a Pass on Federal Statutory Liability, At Least for Now

Consumers may accept “good enough” when it comes to the performance of certain artificial intelligence systems, such as AI-powered Internet search results. But in the case of autonomous vehicles, a recent article in The Economist argues that those same consumers will more likely favor AI-infused vehicles demonstrating the “best” safety record. If that holds true, a recent Congressional bill directed at autonomous vehicles–the so-called “Safely Ensuring Lives Future Deployment and Research in Vehicle Evolution Act,” or the SELF DRIVE Act (H.R. 3388)–should be well received by safety-conscious consumers. If signed into law, however, H.R. 3388 will require those same consumers…

How Privacy Law’s Beginnings May Suggest An Approach For Regulating Artificial Intelligence

A survey conducted in April 2017 by Morning Consult suggests most Americans are in favor of regulating artificial intelligence technologies. Of 2,200 American adults surveyed, 71% said they strongly or somewhat agreed that there should be national regulation of AI, while only 14% strongly or somewhat disagreed (15% did not express a view). Technology and business leaders speaking out on whether to regulate AI fall into one of two camps: those who generally favor an ex post, case-by-case, common law approach, and those who prefer establishing a statutory and regulatory framework that, ex ante, sets forth clear do’s and don’ts…

Do Artificial Intelligence Technologies Need Regulating?

At some point, yes. But when? And how? Today, AI is largely unregulated by federal and state governments. That may change as technologies incorporating AI continue to expand into communications, education, healthcare, law, law enforcement, manufacturing, transportation, and other industries, and prominent scientists as well as lawmakers continue raising concerns about unchecked AI. The only Congressional proposals directly aimed at AI technologies so far have been limited to regulating Highly Autonomous Vehicles (HAVs, or self-driving cars). In developing those proposals, the House Energy and Commerce Committee brought stakeholders to the table in June 2017 to offer their input. In other…