Advanced Driver Monitoring Systems and the Law: Artificial Intelligence for the Road

Artificial intelligence technologies are expected to usher in a future where fully autonomous vehicles take people to their destinations without direct driver interaction.  During the transition from driver to driverless cars, roads will be filled with highly autonomous vehicles (HAVs) in which drivers behind the wheel are required to take control of vehicle operations at a moment’s notice. This is where AI-based advanced driver monitoring systems (DMS) play a role: ensuring HAV drivers are paying attention.  As big automakers incorporate advanced DMS into more passenger cars, policymakers will seek to ensure that these systems meet acceptable performance and safety standards as well as address issues such as privacy and cybersecurity related to use cases for the technology.  In this post, the technology behind advanced DMS is summarized followed by a brief summary of current governance efforts aimed at the technology.

The term “driver monitoring system,” also sometimes called “driver attention monitor” or “driver vigilance monitoring,” refers to a holistic system for analyzing driver behavior.  The principal goal of advanced DMS (as is the case for “older” DMS) is to return a warning or stimulation to alert and refocus the driver’s attention on the driving task.  In HAVs, advanced DMS is used to prepare the driver to re-take control of the vehicle under specified conditions or circumstances.

In operation, the technology detects behavior patterns indicative of the driver’s level of attention, fatigue, micro-sleep, cognitive load, and other physiological states. But the same technology can also be used for driving/driver experience personalization, such as customizing digital assistant interactions, music selection, route selection, and in-cabin environment settings.

Older DMS was adopted around 2006 with the introduction of electronic stability control, blind spot detection, forward collision warning, and lane departure warning technologies, among others, which indirectly monitor a driver by monitoring a driver’s vehicle performance relative to its environment.  Some of these systems were packaged with names like “drowsy driver monitoring,” “attention assist,” and others.

Advanced DMS technology began appearing in US commercial passenger vehicles starting in 2017.  Advanced DMS is expected to be used in SAE Levels 2 through Level 4 HAVs.  DMS in any form may not be needed for safety purposes once fully autonomous Level 5 is achieved, but the technology will likely continue to be used for personalization purposes even in Level 5 vehicles (which are reportedly not expected to be seen on US roadways until 2025 or later).

Advanced DMS generally tracks a driver’s head and hand positions, as well as the driver’s gaze (i.e., where the driver is looking), but it could also assess feet positions and posture relative to the driver’s seatback.  Cameras and touch sensors provide the necessary interface.  Advanced DMS may also utilize a driver’s voice using far-field speaker array technology and may assess emotion and mood (from facial expressions) and possibly other physiological states using various proximate and remote sensors.  Data from these sensors may be combined with signals from steering angle sensors, lane assist cameras, RADAR, LIDAR, and other sensor signals already available.

Once sensor signal data are collected, machine learning and deep neural networks may process the data.  Computer vision models (deep neural nets), for example, may be used for face/object detection within the vehicle.  Machine learning natural language processing models may be used to assess a driver’s spoken words.  Digital conversational assistant technology may be used to perform speech to text.  Knowledge bases may provide information to allow advanced DMS to take appropriate actions.  In short, much of the same AI tech used in existing human-machine interface (HMI) applications today can be employed inside passenger vehicles as part of advanced DMS.

From a regulatory perspective, in 2016, 20 states had introduced some sort of autonomous vehicle legislation.  In 2017, that number had jumped to 33 states.  No state laws, however, currently mandate the use of advanced DMS.

At the US federal government level, the US National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB), an independent agency that investigates transportation-related accidents, reported that overreliance on the semi-autonomous (Level 2) features of an all-electric vehicle and prolonged driver disengagement from the driving task contributed to a fatal crash in Florida in 2016.  In its report, the NTSB suggested the adoption of more effective monitoring of driver inattention commensurate with the capability level of the automated driving system.  Although the NTSB’s report does not rise to the level of a regulatory mandate for advanced DMS (the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) sets transportation regulations), and applicable statutory language prohibits the admission into evidence or use of any part of an NTSB report related to an accident in a civil action for damages resulting from a matter mentioned in the report, the Board’s conclusions regarding probable cause and recommendations regarding preventing future accidents likely play a role in decisions by carmakers about deploying advanced DMS.

As for the NHTSA itself, while it has not yet promulgated advanced DMS regulations, it did publish an Automated Driving Systems, Vision 2.0: A Vision for Safety, report in September 2017.  While the document is clear that its intent is to provide only voluntary guidance, it calls for the incorporation of HMI systems for driver engagement monitoring, considerations of ways to communicate driving-related information as part of HMI, and encourages applying voluntary guidance from other “relevant organizations” to HAVs.

At the federal legislative level, H.R. 3388, the Safely Ensuring Lives Future Deployment and Research In Vehicle Evolution Act (SELF DRIVE Act) of 2017, contains provisions that would require the Department of Transportation (DOT) to produce a Safety Priority Plan that identifies elements of autonomous vehicles that may require standards.  More specifically, the bill would require NHTSA to identify elements that may require performance standards including HMI, sensors, and actuators, and consider process and procedure standards for software and cybersecurity as necessary.

In Europe, the European New Car Assessment Programme (Euro NCAP), Europe’s vehicle safety ratings and testing body, published its Roadmap 2025: Pursuit of Vision Zero, in September 2017.  In it, the safety testing organization addressed how its voluntary vehicle safety rating system is to be applied to HAVs in Europe.  In particular, the Euro NCAP identifies DMS as a “primary safety feature” standard beginning in 2020 and stated that the technology would need to be included in any new on-road vehicle if the manufacturer wanted to achieve a 5-star safety rating.  Manufacturers are already incorporating advanced DMS in passenger vehicles in response to the Euro NCAP’s position.

Aside from safety standards, advanced DMS may also be subject to federal and state statutory and common laws in the areas of product liability, contract, and privacy laws.  Privacy laws, in particular, will likely need to be considered by those employing advanced DMS in passenger vehicles due to the collection and use of driver and passenger biometric information by DMS.

Legislators, Stockholders, Civil Right Groups, and a CEO Seek Limits on AI Face Recognition Technology

Following the tragic killings of journalists and staff inside the Capital Gazette offices in Annapolis, Maryland, in late June, local police acknowledged that the alleged shooter’s identity was determined using a facial recognition technology widely deployed by Maryland law enforcement personnel.  According to DataWorks Plus, the company contracted to support the Maryland Image Repository System (MIRS) used by Anne Arundel County Police in its investigation, its technology uses face templates derived from facial landmark points extracted from image face data to digitally compare faces to a large database of known faces.  More recent technology, relying on artificial intelligence models, have led to even better and faster image and video analysis used by federal and state law enforcement for facial recognition purposes.  AI-based models can process images and video captured by personal smartphones, laptops, home or business surveillance cameras, drones, and government surveillance cameras, including body-worn cameras used by law enforcement personnel, making it much easier to remotely identify and track objects and people in near-real time.

Recently, facial recognition use cases have led to privacy and civil liberties groups to speak out about potential abuses, with a growing vocal backlash aimed at body-worn cameras and facial recognition technology used in law enforcement surveillance.  Much of the concern centers around the lack of transparency in the use of the technology, potential issues of bias, and the effectiveness of the technology itself.  This has spurred state legislators in several states to seek to impose oversight, transparency, accountability, and other limitations on the tech’s uses.  Some within the tech industry itself have even gone so far as to place self-imposed limits on uses of their software for face data collection and surveillance activities.

Maryland and California are examples of two states whose legislators have targeted law enforcement’s use of facial recognition in surveillance.  In California, state legislators took a recent step toward regulating the technology when SB-1186 was passed by its Senate on May 25, 2018.  In remarks accompanying the bill, legislators concluded that “decisions about whether to use ‘surveillance technology’ for data collection and how to use and store the information collected should not be made by the agencies that would operate the technology, but by the elected bodies that are directly accountable to the residents in their communities who should also have opportunities to review the decision of whether or not to use surveillance technologies.”

If enacted, the California law would require, beginning July 1, 2019, law enforcement to submit a proposed Surveillance Use Policy to an elected governing body, made available to the public, to obtain approval for the use of specific surveillance technologies and the information collected by those technologies.  “Surveillance technology” is defined in the bill to include any electronic device or system with the capacity to monitor and collect audio, visual, locational, thermal, or similar information on any individual or group. This includes, drones with cameras or monitoring capabilities, automated license plate recognition systems, closed-circuit cameras/televisions, International Mobile Subscriber Identity (IMSI) trackers, global positioning system (GPS) technology, software designed to monitor social media services or forecast criminal activity or criminality, radio frequency identification (RFID) technology, body-worn cameras, biometric identification hardware or software, and facial recognition hardware or software.

The bill would prohibit a law enforcement agency from selling, sharing, or transferring information gathered by surveillance technology, except to another law enforcement agency. The bill would provide that any person could bring an action for injunctive relief to prevent a violation of the law and, if successful, could recover reasonable attorney’s fees and costs.  The bill would also establish procedures to ensure that the collection, use, maintenance, sharing, and dissemination of information or data collected with surveillance technology is consistent with respect for individual privacy and civil liberties, and that any approved policy be publicly available on the approved agency’s Internet web site.

With the relatively slow pace of legislative action, at least compared to the speed at which face recognition technology is advancing, some within the tech community have taken matters into their own hands.  Brian Brakeen, for example, CEO of Miami-based facial recognition software company Kairos, recently decided that his company’s AI software will not be made available to any government, “be it America or another nation’s.”  In a TechCrunch opinion published June 24, 2018, Brakeen said, “Whether or not you believe government surveillance is okay using commercial facial recognition in law enforcement is irresponsible and dangerous” because it “opens the door for gross misconduct by the morally corrupt.”  His position is rooted in the knowledge of how advanced AI models like his are created: “[Facial recognition] software is only as smart as the information it’s fed; if that’s predominantly images of, for example, African Americans that are ‘suspect,’ it could quickly learn to simply classify the black man as a categorized threat.”

Kairos is not alone in calling for limits.  A coalition of organizations against facial recognition surveillance published a letter on May 22, 2018, to Amazon’s CEO, Jeff Bezos, in which the signatories demanded that “Amazon stop powering a government surveillance infrastructure that poses a grave threat to customers and communities across the country. Amazon should not be in the business of providing surveillance systems like Rekognition to the government.”  The organizations–civil liberties, academic, religious, and others–alleged that “Amazon Rekognition is primed for abuse in the hands of governments. This product poses a grave threat to communities,” they wrote, “including people of color and immigrants….”

Amazon’s Rekognition system, first announced in late 2016., is a cloud-based platform for performing image and video analysis without the user needing a background in machine learning, a type of AI.  Among its many uses today, Rekognition reportedly allows a user to conduct near real-time automated face recognition, analysis, and face comparisons (assessing the likelihood that faces in different images are the same person), using machine learning models.

A few weeks after the coalition letter dropped, another group, this one a collection of individual and organizational Amazon shareholders, issued a similar letter to Bezos.  In it, the shareholders alleged that “[w]hile Rekognition may be intended to enhance some law enforcement activities, we are deeply concerned it may ultimately violate civil and human rights.”  Several Microsoft employees took a similar stand against Microsoft’s role in its software used by government agencies.

As long as questions surrounding transparency, accountability, and fairness in the use of face recognition technology in law enforcement continue to be raised, tech companies, legislators, and stakeholders will likely continue to react in ways that address immediate concerns.  This may prove effective in the short-term, but no one today can say what AI-based facial detection and recognition technologies will look like in the future or to what extent the technology will be used by law enforcement personnel.

New York City Task Force to Consider Algorithmic Harm

One might hear discussions about backpropagation, activation functions, and gradient descent when visiting an artificial intelligence company. But more recently, terms like bias and harm associated with AI models and products have entered tech’s vernacular. These issues also have the attention of many outside of the tech world following reports of AI systems performing better for some users than for others when making life-altering decisions about prison sentences, creditworthiness, and job hiring, among others.

Considering the recent number of accepted conference papers about algorithmic bias, AI technologists, ethicists, and lawyers seems to be proactively addressing the issue by sharing with each other various technical and other solutions. At the same time, at least one legislative body–the New York City Council–has decided to explore ways to regulate AI technology with an unstated goal of rooting out bias (or at least revealing its presence) by making AI systems more transparent.

New York City’s passage of the “Automated decision systems used by agencies” law (NYC Local Law No. 49 of 2018, effective January 11, 2018), creates a task force under the aegis of Mayor de Blasio’s office. The task force will convene no later than early May 2018 for the purpose of identifying automated decision systems used by New York City government agencies, developing procedures for identifying and remedying harm, developing a process for public review, and assessing the feasibility of archiving automated decision systems and relevant data.

The law defines an “automated decision system” as:

“a computerized implementations of algorithms, including those derived from machine learning or other data processing or artificial intelligence techniques, which are used to make or assist in making decisions.”

The law defines an “agency automated decision system” as:

“an automated decision system used by an agency to make or assist in making decisions concerning rules, policies or actions implemented that impact the public.”

While the law does not specifically call out bias, the source of algorithmic unfairness and harm can be traced in large part to biases in the data used to train algorithmic models. Data can be inherently biased when it reflects the implicit values of a limited number of people involved in its collection and labelling, or when the data chosen for a project does not represent a full cross-section of society (which is partly the result of copyright and other restrictions on access to proprietary data sets, and the ease of access to older or limited data sets where groups of people may be unrepresented or underrepresented). A machine algorithm trained on this data will “learn” the biases, and can perpetuate bias when it is asked to make decisions.

Some argue that making algorithmic black boxes more transparent is key to understanding whether an algorithm is perpetuating bias. The New York City task force could recommend that software companies that provide automated decision systems to New York City agencies make their systems transparent by disclosing details about their models (including source code) and producing the data used to create their models.

Several stakeholders have already expressed concerns about disclosing algorithms and data to regulators. What local agency, for example, would have the resources to evaluate complex AI software systems? And how will source code and data, which may embody trade secrets and include personal information, be safeguarded from inadvertent public disclosure? And what recourse will model developers have before agencies turn over algorithms (and the underlying source code and data) in response to Freedom of Information requests and court-issued subpoenas?

Others have expressed concerns that regulating at the local level may lead to disparate and varying standards and requirements, placing a huge burden on companies. For example, New York City may impose standards different from those imposed by other local governments. Already, companies are having to deal with different state regulations governing AI-infused autonomous vehicles, and will soon have to contend with European Union regulations concerning algorithmic data (GDPR Art. 22; effective May 2018) that may be different than those imposed locally.

Before their job is done, New York City’s task force will likely hear from many stakeholders, each with their own special interests. In the end, the task force’s recommendations, especially those on how to remedy harm, will receive careful scrutiny, and not just by local stakeholders, but also by policymakers far removed from New York City, because as AI technology impacts on society grow, the pressure to regulate AI systems on a national basis is likely to grow.

Information and/or references used for this post came from the following:

NYC Local Law No. 49 of 2018 (available at here) and various hearing transcripts

Letter to Mayor Bill de Blasio, Jan. 22, 2018, from AI Now and others (available here)

EU General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR), Art. 22 (“Automated Individual Decision-Making, Including Profiling”), effective May 2018.

Dixon et. al “Measuring and Mitigating Unintended Bias in Text Classification”; AAAI 2018 (accepted paper).

W. Wallach and G. Marchant, “An Agile Ethical/Legal Model for the International and National Governance of AI and Robotics”; AAAI 2018 (accepted paper).

D. Tobey, “Software Malpractice in the Age of AI: A Guide for the Wary Tech Company”; AAAI 2018 (accepted paper).