News and Analysis of Artificial Intelligence Technology Legal Issues

Obama, Trump, and the Regulation of Artificial Intelligence

Near the end of his second term, President Obama announced a series of workshops and government working groups tasked with “Preparing for the Future of Artificial Intelligence.” Then, just weeks before the 2016 presidential general election, the Obama administration published two reports including one titled “The National Artificial Intelligence Research and Development Plan.” In it, Obama laid out seven strategies for AI-related R&D, including making long-term investments in AI research to enable the United States to remain a world leader in AI, developing effective methods for human-AI interaction, and ensuring the safety, security, and trustworthiness of AI systems. The Obama…

Congress Looking at Data Science for Ways to Improve Patent Operations

When Congress passed the sweeping Leahy-Smith America Invents Act (AIA) on September 16, 2011, legislators weren’t concerned about how data analytics might improve efficiencies at one of the Commerce Department’s most data-heavy institutions: the US Patent Office. Patent reformers at the time were instead focused on curtailing patent troll litigation and conforming aspects of US patent law to those of other countries. Consequently, the Patent Office’s trove of pre-classified, pre-labeled, and semi-structured patent application and invention data–information ripe for big data analytics–remained mostly untapped at the time. Fast forward to 2018 and Congress has finally put patent data in its…

In Your Face Artificial Intelligence: Regulating the Collection and Use of Face Data (Part II)

The technologies behind “face data” collection, detection, recognition, and affect (emotion) analysis were previously summarized. Use cases for face data, and reported concerns about the proliferation of face data collection efforts and instances of face data misuse were also briefly discussed. In this follow-on post, a proposed “face data” definition is explored from a governance perspective, with the purpose of providing more certainty as to when heightened requirements ought to be imposed on those involved in face data collection, storage, and use.  This proposal is motivated in part by the increased risk of identity theft and other instances of misuse…

Patenting Artificial Intelligence Technology: 2018 Continues Upward Innovation Trend

If the number of patents issued in the first quarter of 2018 is any indication, artificial intelligence technology companies were busy a few years ago filing patents for machine learning inventions. According to US Patent and Trademark Office records, the number of US “machine learning” patents issued to US applicants during the first quarter of 2018 rose 17% compared to the same time period in 2017. The number of US “machine learning” patents issued to any applicant (not just US applicants) rose nearly 19% during the same comparative time period. Mostly double-digit increases were also observed in the case of…

Republicans Propose Commission to Study Artificial Intelligence Impacts on National Security

Three Republican members of Congress are co-sponsoring a new bill (H.R. 5356) “To establish the National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence.” Introduced by Rep. Stefanik (R-NY) on March 20, 2018, the bill would create a temporary 11-member Commission tasked with producing an initial report followed by comprehensive annual reports, each providing issue-specific recommendations about national security needs and related risks from advances in artificial intelligence, machine learning, and associated technologies. Issues the Commission would review include AI competitiveness in the context of national and economic security, means to maintain a competitive advantage in AI (including machine learning and quantum computing),…

When It’s Your Data But Another’s Stack, Who Owns The Trained AI Model?

Cloud-based machine learning algorithms, made available as a service, have opened up the world of artificial intelligence to companies without the resources to organically develop their own AI models. Tech companies that provide these services promise to help companies extract insights from the company’s unique customer, employee, product, business process, and other data, and to use those insights to improve decisions, recommendations, and predictions without the company having an army of data scientists and full stack developers. Simply open an account, provide data to the service’s algorithms, train and test an algorithm, and then incorporate the final model into the…

Evaluating and Valuing an AI Business: Don’t Forget the IP

After record-breaking funding and deals involving artificial intelligence startups in 2017, it may be tempting to invest in the next AI business or business idea without a close look beyond a company’s data, products, user-base, and talent. Indeed, big tech companies seem willing to acquire, and investors seem happy to invest in, AI startups even before the founders have built anything. Defensible business valuations, however, involve many more factors, all of which need careful consideration during early planning of a new AI business or investing in one. One factor that should never be overlooked is a company’s actual or potential…

Recognizing Individual Rights: A Step Toward Regulating Artificial Intelligence Technologies

In the movie Marjorie | Prime (August 2017), John Hamm plays an artificial intelligence version of Marjorie’s deceased husband, visible to Marjorie as a holographic projection in her beachfront home. As Marjorie (played by Lois Smith) interacts with Hamm’s Prime through a series of one-on-one conversations, the AI improves its cognition by observing and processing Marjorie’s emotional expressions, movements, and speech. The AI also learns from interactions with Marjorie’s son-in-law (Tim Robbins) and daughter (Geena Davis), as they recount highly personal and painful episodes of their lives. Through these interactions, Prime ends up possessing a collective knowledge greater and more…

Legal Tech, Artificial Intelligence, and the Practice of Law in 2018

Due in part to a better understanding of available artificial intelligence legal tech tools, more lawyers will adopt and use AI technologies in 2018 than ever before. Better awareness will also drive creation and marketing of specialized legal practice areas within law firms focused on AI, more lawyers with AI expertise, new business opportunities across multiple practice groups, and the possibly of another round of Associate salary increases as the demand for AI talent both in-house and at law firms escalates in response to the continued expansion of AI in key industries. The legal services industry is poised to adopt…

Congress Takes Aim at the FUTURE of Artificial Intelligence

As the calendar turns over to 2018, artificial intelligence system developers will need to keep an eye on first of its kind legislation being considered in Congress. The “Fundamentally Understanding The Usability and Realistic Evolution of Artificial Intelligence Act of 2017,” or FUTURE of AI Act, is Congress’s first major step toward comprehensive regulation of the AI tech sector. Introduced on December 22, 2017, companion bills S.2217 and H.R.4625 touch on a host of AI issues, their stated purposes mirroring concerns raised by many about possible problems facing society as AI technologies becomes ubiquitous. The bills propose to establish a federal advisory committee…