News and Analysis of Artificial Intelligence Technology Legal Issues
Order from chaos

Artificial Intelligence, Risk Disclosures, and a New SEC Materiality Test

When Microsoft shared in 2018 that certain “deficiencies” surrounding its artificial intelligence practices could “subject[] us to competitive harm, legal liability, and brand or reputational harm,” it set the stage for other companies to self-report perceived risks associated with developing, using and producing AI technologies. Disclosing risks–a Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) requirement imposed on public companies since 2005–raises a number of important considerations for both public as well as private companies, including transparency, accuracy, and the degree of speculation that may be acceptable when discussing AI impacts.  Although companies in industry segments other than AI face similar concerns, AI…

Lady Justice

California Appeals Court Denies Defendant Access to Algorithm That Contributed Evidence to His Conviction

One of the concerns expressed by those studying algorithmic decision-making is the apparent lack of transparency. Those impacted by adverse algorithmic decisions often seek transparency to better understand the basis for the decisions. In the case of software used in legal proceedings, parties who seek explanations about software face a number of obstacles, including those imposed by evidentiary rules, criminal or civil procedural rules, and by software companies that resist discovery requests. The closely-followed issue of algorithmic transparency was recently considered by a California appellate court in People v. Superior Court of San Diego County, slip op. Case D073943 (Cal.…

How Privacy Law’s Beginnings May Suggest An Approach For Regulating Artificial Intelligence

A survey conducted in April 2017 by Morning Consult suggests most Americans are in favor of regulating artificial intelligence technologies. Of 2,200 American adults surveyed, 71% said they strongly or somewhat agreed that there should be national regulation of AI, while only 14% strongly or somewhat disagreed (15% did not express a view). Technology and business leaders speaking out on whether to regulate AI fall into one of two camps: those who generally favor an ex post, case-by-case, common law approach, and those who prefer establishing a statutory and regulatory framework that, ex ante, sets forth clear do’s and don’ts…