Senate-Passed Defense Authorization Bill Funds Artificial Intelligence Programs

The Senate-passed national defense appropriations bill (H.R.5515, as amended), to be known as the John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019, includes spending provisions for several artificial intelligence technology programs.

Passed by a vote of 85-10 on June 18, 2018, the bill would include appropriations for the Department of Defense “to coordinate the efforts of the Department to develop, mature, and transition artificial intelligence technologies into operational use.” A designated Coordinator will serve to oversee joint activities of the services in the development of a Strategic Plan for AI-related research and development.  The Coordinator will also facilitate the acceleration of development and fielding of AI technologies across the services.  Notably, the Coordinator is to develop appropriate ethical, legal, and other policies governing the development and use of AI-enabled systems in operational situations. Within one year of enactment, the Coordinator is to complete a study on the future of AI in the context of DOD missions, including recommendations for integrating “the strengths and reliability of artificial intelligence and machine learning with the inductive reasoning power of a human.”

In other provisions, the Director of the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA; based in Ft. Meade, MD) is tasked with submitting a report to Congress within 90 days of enactment that directly compares the capabilities of the US in emerging technologies (including AI) and the capabilities of US adversaries in those technologies.

The bill would require the Under Secretary for R&D to pilot the use of machine-vision technologies to automate certain human weapons systems manufacturing tasks. Specifically, tests would be conducted to assess whether computer vision technology is effective and at a level of readiness to perform the function of determining the authenticity of microelectronic parts at the time of creation through final insertion into weapon systems.

The Senate version of the 2019 appropriations bill replaces an earlier House version (passed 351-66 on May 24, 2018).

Republicans Propose Commission to Study Artificial Intelligence Impacts on National Security

Three Republican members of Congress are co-sponsoring a new bill (H.R. 5356) “To establish the National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence.” Introduced by Rep. Stefanik (R-NY) on March 20, 2018, the bill would create a temporary 11-member Commission tasked with producing an initial report followed by comprehensive annual reports, each providing issue-specific recommendations about national security needs and related risks from advances in artificial intelligence, machine learning, and associated technologies.

Issues the Commission would review include AI competitiveness in the context of national and economic security, means to maintain a competitive advantage in AI (including machine learning and quantum computing), other country AI investment trends, workforce and education incentives to boost the number of AI workers, risks of advances in the military employment of AI by foreign countries, ethics, privacy, and data security, among others.

Unlike other Congressional bills of late (see H.R. 4625–FUTURE of AI Act; H.R. 4829–AI JOBS Act) that propose establishing committees under Executive Branch departments and constituted with both government employees and private citizens, H.R. 5356 would establish an independent Executive Branch commission made up exclusively of Federal employees appointed by Department of Defense and various Armed Services Committee members, with no private citizen members (ostensibly because of national security and security clearance issues).

Congressional focus on AI technologies has generally been limited to highly autonomous vehicles and vehicle safety, with other areas, such as military impacts, receiving much less attention. By way of contrast, the UK’s Parliament seems far ahead. The UK Parliament Select Committee on AI has already met over a dozen times since mid-2017 and its members have convened numerous public meetings to hear from dozens of experts and stakeholders representing various disciplines and economic sectors.