News and Analysis of Artificial Intelligence Technology Legal Issues

Republicans Propose Commission to Study Artificial Intelligence Impacts on National Security

Three Republican members of Congress are co-sponsoring a new bill (H.R. 5356) “To establish the National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence.” Introduced by Rep. Stefanik (R-NY) on March 20, 2018, the bill would create a temporary 11-member Commission tasked with producing an initial report followed by comprehensive annual reports, each providing issue-specific recommendations about national security needs and related risks from advances in artificial intelligence, machine learning, and associated technologies. Issues the Commission would review include AI competitiveness in the context of national and economic security, means to maintain a competitive advantage in AI (including machine learning and quantum computing),…

Industry Focus: The Rise of Data-Driven Health Tech Innovation

Artificial intelligence-based healthcare technologies have contributed to improved drug discoveries, tumor identification, diagnosis, risk assessments, electronic health records (EHR), and mental health tools, among others. Thanks in large part to AI and the availability of health-related data, health tech is one of the fastest growing segments of healthcare and one of the reasons why the sector ranks highest on many lists. According to a 2016 workforce study by Georgetown University, the healthcare industry experienced the largest employment growth among all industries since December 2007, netting 2.3 million jobs (about an 8% increase). Fourteen percent of all US workers work in…

Congress Takes Aim at the FUTURE of Artificial Intelligence

As the calendar turns over to 2018, artificial intelligence system developers will need to keep an eye on first of its kind legislation being considered in Congress. The “Fundamentally Understanding The Usability and Realistic Evolution of Artificial Intelligence Act of 2017,” or FUTURE of AI Act, is Congress’s first major step toward comprehensive regulation of the AI tech sector. Introduced on December 22, 2017, companion bills S.2217 and H.R.4625 touch on a host of AI issues, their stated purposes mirroring concerns raised by many about possible problems facing society as AI technologies becomes ubiquitous. The bills propose to establish a federal advisory committee…

Patenting Artificial Intelligence: Innovation Spike Follows Broader Market Trend

If you received a US patent for a machine learning invention recently, count yourself among a record number of innovators named on artificial intelligence technology patents issued in 2017. There’s also good chance you worked for one of the top companies earning patents for machine learning, neural network, and other AI technologies, namely IBM, Amazon, Cisco, Google, and Microsoft, according to public patent records (available through mid-December). This year’s increase in the number of issued patents reflects similar record increases in the level of investment dollars flowing to AI start-ups and the number of AI tech sector M&A deals in…

The AI Summit New York City: Takeaways For the Legal Profession

This week, business, technology, and academic thought leaders in Artificial Intelligence are gathered at The AI Summit in New York City, one of the premier international conferences offered for AI professionals. Below, I consider two of the three takeaways from Summit Day 1, published yesterday by AI Business, from the perspective of lawyers looking for opportunities in the burgeoning AI market. “1. The tech landscape is changing fast – with big implications for businesses” If a year from now your law practice has not fielded at least one query from a client about AI technologies, you are probably going out…

How Privacy Law’s Beginnings May Suggest An Approach For Regulating Artificial Intelligence

A survey conducted in April 2017 by Morning Consult suggests most Americans are in favor of regulating artificial intelligence technologies. Of 2,200 American adults surveyed, 71% said they strongly or somewhat agreed that there should be national regulation of AI, while only 14% strongly or somewhat disagreed (15% did not express a view). Technology and business leaders speaking out on whether to regulate AI fall into one of two camps: those who generally favor an ex post, case-by-case, common law approach, and those who prefer establishing a statutory and regulatory framework that, ex ante, sets forth clear do’s and don’ts…