News and Analysis of Artificial Intelligence Technology Legal Issues
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FTC Orders AI Company to Delete its Model Following Consumer Protection Law Violation

The nation’s consumer protection watchdog–the Federal Trade Commission (FTC)–took extraordinary law enforcement measures on January 11, 2021, after finding an artificial intelligence company had deceived customers about its data collection and use practices. In a first of its kind settlement involving facial recognition surveillance systems, the FTC ordered Everalbum, Inc., the now shuttered maker of the “Ever” photo album app and related website, to delete or destroy any machine learning and other models or algorithms developed in whole or in part using biometric information it unlawfully collected from users, along with the biometric data itself. In doing so, the agency…

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Civil Litigation Discovery Approaches in the Era of Advanced Artificial Intelligence Technologies

For nearly as long as computers have existed, litigators have used software-generated machine output to buttress their cases, and courts have had to manage a host of machine-related evidentiary issues, including deciding whether a machine’s output, or testimony based on the output, could fairly be admitted as evidence and to what extent. Today, as litigants begin contesting cases involving aspects of so-called intelligent machines–hardware/software systems endowed with machine learning algorithms and other artificial intelligence-based models–their lawyers and the judges overseeing their cases may need to rely on highly-nuanced discovery strategies aimed at gaining insight into the nature of those algorithms,…

When It’s Your Data But Another’s Stack, Who Owns The Trained AI Model?

Cloud-based machine learning algorithms, made available as a service, have opened up the world of artificial intelligence to companies without the resources to organically develop their own AI models. Tech companies that provide these services promise to help companies extract insights from the company’s unique customer, employee, product, business process, and other data, and to use those insights to improve decisions, recommendations, and predictions without the company having an army of data scientists and full stack developers. Simply open an account, provide data to the service’s algorithms, train and test an algorithm, and then incorporate the final model into the…