News and Analysis of Artificial Intelligence Technology Legal Issues
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Are Europe’s Proposed AI Regulations Tough Enough?

The European Commission’s proposed new regulations for artificial intelligence (AI) technologies and systems (link to PDF here; issued April 21, 2021) include enforcement provisions that would empower public authorities to monitor regulated AI entities operating in the European Union (EU) and seek stiff fines from those that do not comply with the rules. The proposed regulations would also grant authorities the power to impose non-monetary penalties, including ordering offending companies to remove their AI systems from the EU market. These are some tough measures, assuming public authorities exercise their discretion in a way that actually incentivizes compliance and positive behavior.…

Ursula von der Leyen EU Commission President

Proposed New EU AI Regulations: A Pre-Planning Guide for U.S. In-House Counsel

If the European Commission’s newly proposed harmonized rules on Artificial Intelligence (the “Artificial Intelligence Act”) (published April 21, 2021) are adopted, U.S.-based AI companies operating in European Union (EU) countries (or expecting to do so) may soon be subject to significant new regulatory requirements. The proposed regulations (available PDF here), with few exceptions, would apply to companies or individuals (“providers”) who place on the market or put into service certain high-risk AI systems in the EU, “users” (including companies) of those AI systems who are located in the EU, and providers and users of such AI systems that are located…

US Capitol Building

Artificial Intelligence, GANs, and the law of Synthetic Data: Lawmakers React to False Media Content

It didn’t take long for someone to turn generative adversarial networks (GAN)–a machine learning technique that at first blush seemed benign and of somewhat limited utility at its unveiling–into a tool with the ability to cause real harm.  Now, Congress has stepped up and passed legislation to focus the federal government’s attention on the technology.  If signed by the president, the legislation will require two federal agencies to study the role GANs play in producing false media content and report their findings back to respective House and Senate committees, which is seen as a prelude to possible notice-and-comment regulations and…

Crystal ball

A Look Into the Future of AI Governance

The year 2020 may be remembered for its pandemic and presidential election. But it also marked a turning point in efforts to regulate artificial intelligence (AI) technologies and the systems that embody them. State lawmakers in two states joined Illinois in enacting laws directed at AI-generated biometric data, and federal lawmakers introduced their own measure.  The White House in January began exploring frameworks for governing AI.  Still, the AI legal landscape remains uncertain especially for stakeholders who develop and use AI systems and want more predictability so they can properly manage legal liability risks. In this post, a time frame…

Woman's face with landmarks used in facial recognition

Congress, States Introduce New Laws for Facial Recognition, Face Data – Part 2

In Part I, new proposed federal and state laws governing the collection, storage, and use of face (biometric) data in connection with facial recognition technology were described.  If enacted, those new laws would join Illinois’ Biometric Information Privacy Act (BIPA), California’s Consumer Data Privacy Act (CCPA), and Texas’ “biometric identifier” regulations in the governance of face-related data.  It is reasonable for businesses to assume that other state laws and regulations will follow, and with them a shifting legal landscape creating uncertainty and potential legal risks.  A thoughtful and proactive approach to managing the risks associated with the use of facial…

Woman's face with landmarks used in facial recognition

Congress, States Introduce New Laws for Facial Recognition, Face Data – Part I

Companies developing artificial intelligence-based products and services have been on the lookout for laws and regulations aimed at their technology.  In the case of facial recognition, new federal and state laws seem closer than ever.  Examples include Washington State’s recent data privacy and facial recognition bill (SB 5376; recent action on March 6, 2019) and the federal Commercial Facial Recognition Privacy Act of 2019 (S. 847, introduced March 14, 2019).  If enacted, these new laws would join others like Illinois’ Biometric Information Privacy Act (BIPA) and California’s Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) in governing facial recognition systems and the collection, storage,…

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Government Plans to Issue Technical Standards For Artificial Intelligence Technologies

On February 11, 2019, the White House published a plan for developing and protecting artificial intelligence technologies in the United States, citing economic and national security concerns among other reasons for the action.  Coming two years after Beijing’s 2017 announcement that China intends to be the global leader in AI by 2030, President Trump’s Executive Order on Maintaining American Leadership in Artificial Intelligence lays out five principles for AI, including “development of appropriate technical standards and reduc[ing] barriers to the safe testing and deployment of AI technologies in order to enable the creation of new AI-related industries and the adoption of…

Recognizing Individual Rights: A Step Toward Regulating Artificial Intelligence Technologies

In the movie Marjorie | Prime (August 2017), John Hamm plays an artificial intelligence version of Marjorie’s deceased husband, visible to Marjorie as a holographic projection in her beachfront home. As Marjorie (played by Lois Smith) interacts with Hamm’s Prime through a series of one-on-one conversations, the AI improves its cognition by observing and processing Marjorie’s emotional expressions, movements, and speech. The AI also learns from interactions with Marjorie’s son-in-law (Tim Robbins) and daughter (Geena Davis), as they recount highly personal and painful episodes of their lives. Through these interactions, Prime ends up possessing a collective knowledge greater and more…

The AI Summit New York City: Takeaways For the Legal Profession

This week, business, technology, and academic thought leaders in Artificial Intelligence are gathered at The AI Summit in New York City, one of the premier international conferences offered for AI professionals. Below, I consider two of the three takeaways from Summit Day 1, published yesterday by AI Business, from the perspective of lawyers looking for opportunities in the burgeoning AI market. “1. The tech landscape is changing fast – with big implications for businesses” If a year from now your law practice has not fielded at least one query from a client about AI technologies, you are probably going out…

How Privacy Law’s Beginnings May Suggest An Approach For Regulating Artificial Intelligence

A survey conducted in April 2017 by Morning Consult suggests most Americans are in favor of regulating artificial intelligence technologies. Of 2,200 American adults surveyed, 71% said they strongly or somewhat agreed that there should be national regulation of AI, while only 14% strongly or somewhat disagreed (15% did not express a view). Technology and business leaders speaking out on whether to regulate AI fall into one of two camps: those who generally favor an ex post, case-by-case, common law approach, and those who prefer establishing a statutory and regulatory framework that, ex ante, sets forth clear do’s and don’ts…